Covid-19 Vaccination Programme

SPRING BOOSTERS

You will be offered a spring Covid-19 booster if you:

  • are aged 75 and over
  • live in a care home for older people
  • are aged 12 and over and have a weakened immune system

COVID-19 may affect you more seriously if you are in one of these groups. The spring booster is being offered to help reduce your risk of getting seriously ill from COVID-19.

When to get your spring booster

You will be contacted by the NHS when you are due a spring booster. You will usually be offered an appointment around 6 months after your last dose of COVID-19 vaccine.

If you are eligible for a spring booster, but have not had a 1st or 2nd dose of the COVID-19 vaccine yet, you should have them as soon as possible.

If you have a severely weakened immune system you need to get a 3rd dose before you get a booster.

Find out more about the COVID-19 vaccine for people with a severely weakened immune system

How to get your spring booster

You will be contacted by the NHS and invited to book your spring booster when it's due.

You may be offered appointment dates from 3 months (91 days) after your last dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. But try to book an appointment around 6 months after your last dose to get the best protection from your spring booster.

Book a COVID-19 vaccination appointment online for your spring booster if you are:

  • aged 75 and over
  • aged 12 and over and have a weakened immune system

If you live in a care home for older people, contact your care home manager about getting vaccinated.

Find out more about COVID-19 vaccination spring boosters for those aged 75 years and older residents in care homes on GOV.UK

How to get a first and second dose of the Covid-19 Vaccine

 Everyone aged 12 and over, and some children aged 5 to 11, can get a 1st and 2nd dose of the coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine.

If you have not booked your appointments yet, you're still eligible and can book anytime.

If you've had a positive COVID-19 test, you need to wait before getting the COVID-19 vaccine.

People aged 18 and over, and eligible children aged 5 to 11, need to wait 4 weeks. Children and young people aged 12 to 17 need to wait 12 weeks.

People aged 16 and over

If you're aged 16 or over you can:

If you cannot book appointments online, you can call 119 free of charge. You can speak to a translator if you need to.

If you have difficulties communicating or hearing, or are a British Sign Language (BSL) user, you can use textphone 18001 119 or the NHS 119 BSL interpreter service.

Booking your 2nd dose

If you're aged 18 or over, you should have your 2nd dose from 8 weeks after your 1st dose.

Most young people aged 16 and 17 should have their 2nd dose from 12 weeks after their 1st dose.

  • If you book online, you'll be asked to book appointments for both doses. You can manage your COVID-19 vaccination appointments to view your appointments and rebook if you need to.
  • If you had your 1st dose at a walk-in vaccination site, you can book your 2nd COVID-19 vaccination appointment online. You'll need to wait 24 hours after your 1st dose before you can book.
  • If you had your 1st dose through a local NHS service such as your GP surgery, you'll be contacted when it's time to book your 2nd dose.

Children aged 12 to 15

All children aged 12 to 15 can get a 1st and 2nd dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

Most children aged 12 to 15 can:

Find out more about COVID-19 vaccination for children aged 12 to 15

Some children aged 5 to 11

Some children aged 5 to 11 can get a 1st and 2nd dose of the COVID-19 vaccine if either:

  • they have a condition that means they're at high risk of getting seriously ill from COVID-19
  • they live with someone who has a weakened immune system

Parents and guardians will get an invitation from a local NHS service such as a GP surgery or a hospital specialist to make an appointment for their child.

A small number of walk-in COVID-19 vaccination sites are also offering the vaccine to children aged 5 to 11. You'll need to bring the letter, email or text inviting your child for their vaccine.

If your child has not received an invitation but you think they are eligible for the vaccine, call 119 free of charge. 119 can advise you how to get a vaccination appointment.

Find out more about COVID-19 vaccination for children aged 5 to 11 on GOV.UK

If you're not sure if your child is at high risk, see who is at high risk from COVID-19.

COVID-19 booster vaccinations for housebound patients

Booster vaccinations for housebound patients are currently underway in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough, with a number of providers including NHS Trust and community pharmacy teams delivering boosters. The NHS will contact you directly to offer you a booster vaccination within your home.

As our GP Practice is not delivering vaccinations to housebound patients at this stage, please do not call us to ask when you will be vaccinated as we will not be in a position to tell you when you will get your booster.

If you have become housebound since you received your second vaccine, please contact us to let us know so that we can make a note on your record to reflect that you are now housebound. This will enable the NHS to contact you to offer you a vaccine within your home.

If you feel able to you are very welcome to book your COVID-19 booster vaccination outside your home, by visiting www.nhs.uk/covidvaccine or by calling 119.

If you need support to travel to a vaccination site, our Local Authorities provide a Transport Support Offer. You can find out more about this offer via www.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/residents/coronavirus/covid-19-vaccination, or by calling 0345 045 5219.

Covid-19 Vaccination Third Primary Vaccine Dose

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) has advised that people with severely weakened immune systems should have a third vaccine dose as part of their primary COVID-19 vaccination schedule. If you are eligible to have your third primary vaccination, the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) will write to you to advise you on how to access this dose.

If you have received a letter from the CCG letting you know that you're eligible, they have provided some helpful frequently asked questions and answers on their website. 

https://www.cambridgeshireandpeterboroughccg.nhs.uk/news-and-events/latest-news/covid-19-national-vaccination-programme/frequently-asked-questions-regarding-the-third-primary-dose/

Tell the NHS about Covid-19 Vaccinations you have had abroad

This service enables you to book an appointment to show evidence for any coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccinations you've had outside of England. This is so the NHS can securely update your vaccination record.

Children aged 5 and above with an NHS number who have had 1 or more COVID-19 vaccinations outside of England can now have them recorded in the National Immunisation Management System (NIMS). 

Appointments can be booked on the National Booking Service to show evidence of their vaccinations.

An updated list of approved vaccines can be found on the booking page.

Covid-19 Vaccination Walk-In Clinics in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough

A number of walk-in COVID-19 vaccination clinics are taking place across our area.  Use the link below for details of the different walk-in options.

https://www.cambridgeshireandpeterboroughccg.nhs.uk/news-and-events/latest-news/covid-19-national-vaccination-programme/information-regarding-walk-in-clinics/

How to access your COVID-19 vaccination status

From 17 May 2021, people in England who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19 can demonstrate their vaccination status for international travel. A full course is currently two doses of any approved vaccine. Vaccine status will be available from: 

  • the NHS App which you can download from app stores 

  • the NHS website 

  • 119 - by requesting a paper letter

You will need to register to use the online services, if you have not already. It may take more than a week for your identity to be checked and verified.

If you cannot access the online services, and you have had both doses of the vaccine, you can request a paper letter from the NHS by calling 119. Only call 119 if you are due to travel outside the UK in the near future and have had your second dose more than 5 working days ago. It may take up to 7 working days for the letter to arrive.

This practice is not able to provide you with a letter that shows your COVID-19 vaccination status. Please do not contact the practice about your COVID-19 vaccination status unless you have been advised to by the 119 service.

When you're planning your travel, you should check the latest information on demonstrating your COVID-19 status when travelling abroad on the gov.uk website. Make sure there is enough time to get proof of your COVID-19 vaccination status before you are due to travel.

 

Covid-19 Vaccine Side Effects

Most side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine are mild and should not last longer than a week, such as:

  • a sore arm where the needle went in
  • feeling tired
  • a headache
  • feeling achy
  • feeling or being sick

You can take painkillers, such as paracetamol, if you need to.

You may get a high temperature or feel hot or shivery 1 or 2 days after having your vaccination.

But if you have a high temperature that lasts longer than 2 days, a new, continuous cough or a loss or change to your sense of smell or taste you may have COVID-19. Stay at home and get a test.

If your symptoms get worse or you are worried, call 111.

Reports of extremely rare blood clots

The MHRA is carrying out a detailed review of reports of an extremely rare blood clotting problem affecting a small number of people who have had the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine.

The problem can also happen in people who have not been vaccinated and it's not yet clear why it affects some people.

The COVID-19 vaccine can help stop you getting seriously ill or dying from COVID-19. For people aged 40 or over and those with other health conditions, the benefits of being vaccinated with the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine outweigh any risk of clotting problems.

For people under 40 without other health conditions, it's currently advised that it's preferable to have another COVID-19 vaccine instead of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine.

Call 111 immediately if you get any of these symptoms starting from around 4 days to 4 weeks after being vaccinated:

  • a severe headache that is not relieved with painkillers or is getting worse
  • a headache that feels worse when you lie down or bend over
  • a headache that's unusual for you and occurs with blurred vision, feeling or being sick, problems speaking, weakness, drowsiness or seizures (fits)
  • a rash that looks like small bruises or bleeding under the skin
  • shortness of breath, chest pain, leg swelling or persistent abdominal (tummy) pain

Find out more about COVID-19 vaccination and blood clotting on GOV.UK

So far, millions of people have been given a COVID-19 vaccine and reports of serious side effects, such as allergic reactions or clotting problems, have been very rare.

To find out more about the vaccines approved in the UK, see:

UPDATE ON OXFORD/ASTRAZENECA VACCINE April 2021

The MHRA is carrying out a detailed review of reports of a very rare blood clotting problem affecting a small number of people who have had the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine

The problem can also happen in people who have not been vaccinated and it's not yet clear why it affects some people.

The COVID-19 vaccine can help stop you getting seriously ill or dying from coronavirus. For people aged 30 or over and those with other health conditions, the benefits of being vaccinated outweigh any risk of clotting problems.

For people under 30 without other health conditions, it's currently advised that it's preferable to have another COVID-19 vaccine instead of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine.

Call 111 immediately if you get any of these symptoms starting from around 4 days to 4 weeks after being vaccinated:

  • a severe headache that is not relieved with painkillers or is getting worse
  • a headache that feels worse when you lie down or bend over
  • a headache that's unusual for you and occurs with blurred vision, feeling or being sick, problems speaking, weakness, drowsiness or seizures (fits)
  • a rash that looks like small bruises or bleeding under the skin
  • shortness of breath, chest pain, leg swelling or persistent abdominal (tummy) pain

Public Health England has published a guide for patients with more information on Covid-19 vaccination and blood clotting.

AZ vaccine blood clot FAQ.pdf

Covid-19 Vaccination - Guidance for Women of Childbearing Age, Currently Pregnant or Breast Feeding

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) has advised that pregnant women should be offered COVID-19 vaccines at the same time as people of the same age or risk group.  The COVID-19 vaccines available in the UK have been shown to be effective and to have a good safety profile. These vaccines do not contain live coronavirus and cannot infect a pregnant woman or her unborn baby in the womb.

If you are currently pregnant or breastfeeding, read the latest guidance from Public Health England (April 2021).

Covid-19 Vaccination In Pregnancy.pdf

Covid-19 Vaccination and Severe Mental Illness

If you are an adult living with a severe mental illness in England you should now be eligible for a Covid-19 vaccination.  You could also be eligible if you care for someone with a severe mental illness.

The Covid-19 vaccine is safe and effective.  It is being offered to priority groups first, before being offered to all adults in the UK whether they are in a priority group or not.  Working age people (aged 16-64) with severe mental illness are included in Priorty Group 6 and also includes those with learning disabilities.  Equally Well UK have produced a guide for people with severe mental illness and their carers on what to expect from the Covid-19 vaccination programme. 

New videos to support people with severe mental illness get their COVID19 vaccine and advice for primary care professionals that support people with SMI are now available here: https://bit.ly/3fM24KF

Covid-19 Vaccination and Severe Mental Illness.pdf