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Noticeboard

TELEPHONE ADVICE 

The doctors and nurses are happy to speak to patients by telephone, outside consulting times. Please leave your details with our reception staff and a doctor / nurse will return your call between surgeries.

OUT OF HOURS

Overnight, at weekends and bank holidays NHS Cambridgeshire has commissioned Herts Urgent Care to provide out of hours cover.  They can be contacted by ringing 111.

APPOINTMENTS

We offer ten minute appointments, and these can be made by telephone or in person throughout our opening hours of 8.30am to 6.00pm.

DISPENSARY CALLS

The Dispensary take telephone enquiries between the hours of 10am - 6pm. 

CANCELLING YOUR APPOINTMENT

If you are unable to attend an appointment with one of the doctors or nurses, please telephone as soon as possible to enable us to offer the appointment to someone else.

TEST RESULTS

Please call 01223 810030 for test results between 10-6pm Monday-Friday.  Please allow one week for the results to be returned to us. 

WHEELCHAIR LOAN SERVICE

We have a wheelchair here at the surgery which is available for patients to borrow for up to a maximum of one week. Just contact us and we will let you know if it 's available.

VERRUCAS

Most people develop one or more warts at some time in their life, usually before the age of 20. About 1 in 10 people in the UK has warts at any one time. They are not usually harmful.  There is no need to treat warts if they are not causing you any problems. Without treatment, about 3 in 10 warts have gone within 10 weeks, and most warts will have gone within 1-2 years, and leave no scar.   Clinicians at Bottisham Medical Practice do not usually treat verrucas but are happy to provide advice if required.  Alternatively, please see: http://www.patient.co.uk/health/warts-and-verrucas for further information.

Asthma

Diagnosis –what is it?

boy_with_inhalerAsthma is one of the commonest of all medical conditions 7% of our patients at Bottisham Medical Practice have it. It causes repeated symptoms of cough, breathlessness, wheezing and chest tightness which are brought on by different triggering actors in sensitive people. These triggering factors are different for each person, so one person may get wheeze and cough after running, stroking a dog or with hayfever, whereas another person may just get a cough that does not go away after a cold.

Common trigger factors:

  • Viral infections, colds or flu
  • Allergies e.g. pollen, animals, house dust mite
  • Irritants e.g. cold air, tobacco smoke, chemical fumes

Exercise

Asthma is not always predictable or stable, so even if a person knows their regular trigger factors other things can set it off, for example, one lady told me that damp pillows on a barge holiday triggered her asthma and another lady became unexpectedly wheezy on emptying her vacuum cleaner.

Treatment

It is important to recognise and treat asthma properly to prevent it becoming dangerous or damaging to lung health. There are different inhalers used to treat asthma. Broadly speaking these are inhalers that prevent or relieve symptoms of asthma. Because asthma treatment is important to lung health and because the nature of asthmatic symptoms change as the years go by, we ask you to come in each year with your inhalers for an asthma review. The inhaler device that you use needs thinking about and the dose and sometimes the type of medication needs reviewing as your requirements may change with time, or changing environmental factors like the weather or the hayfever season. I have found that even if someone thinks that their asthma is well controlled there are usually issues which need addressing or small changes made to the medication or things like emergency management of asthma that can be addressed and so I feel that asthma reviews are very useful.

Sometimes it is important to see people with asthma in between reviews if the asthma is becoming unstable. This is because infections like colds or chest infections can appear or a new unexpected trigger factor can make things worse. At these times other treatments like antibiotics may be needed or a change to the inhalers. In the surgery I have seen a lot of people whose asthma is unstable but they have not realised. You may notice this happening by having to use the blue inhaler which is called Salbutamol or Terbutaline more regularly or by having a poor night's sleep due to coughing or wheezing, please come in and be seen if this is happening to you.

Staying well with asthma

  • Using inhalers appropriately and properly
  • Stopping or not starting smoking
  • Regular exercise
  • Possibly having vaccinations to prevent flu or pneumonia

Learning more about your asthma.

A web site which you can look at and is well run and factually correct is http://www.asthma.org.uk/ and we have some of their literature in the surgery so please ask if this would be helpful.



 
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